System Call Traces

System Call I/O Traces typically reflect operating system calls to the file system.

The following traces are free to download under the terms of the SNIA Trace Data Files Download License. Please note that cookies must be enabled within your browser in order to download traces.
For questions about downloading using a shell script, see Using Shell Scripts, and for more information about downloading using a Windows batch script, see Using Batch Scripts.


Displaying all 3 Traces


Trace Name Details Related Tools Year Recorded Timespan Record Count File Size Actions
FIU Filesystem SysCall Traces
System-call traces from "Non-blocking Writes to Files" in the Proceedings of the USENIX Conference on File and Storage Technologies, February, 2015. The six main traces are all one day of traces collected on 09/16/2014. All the systems were running Linux using the ext4 and zfs file systems. The two replayed traces are two minute traces collected while replaying the original Mobibench traces. The replay was done on a Linux system using an ext4 file system.
2014 7 days 453 Million
MobiGen Traces
2 minute I/O traces generated using the Mobigen tool. Information about the tool is described in the README file. These traces are related to the paper I/O Stack Optimization for Smartphones by Sooman Jeong, Kisung Lee, Seongjin Lee, Seoungbum Son, Samsung Electronics, and Youjip Won.
2013 5 minutes 97.8 Thousand 19.3 MB
iBench Traces This trace has no related tools yet. 2011 7 days 9.01 Million 115 MB

Displaying all 3 Traces

View Historical Traces

WARNING: These traces are over 10 years old! They should not be used for modern research!

The following traces are free to download under the terms of the SNIA Trace Data Files Download License. Please note that cookies must be enabled within your browser in order to download traces.
For questions about downloading using a shell script, see Using Shell Scripts, and for more information about downloading using a Windows batch script, see Using Batch Scripts.

Trace Name Details Actions
TraceFS Sample Traces
Sample traces of three benchmark runs collected with the TraceFS tracing system.

Additional information about TraceFS can be found at the following URL: http://www.filesystems.org/project-tracefs.html

This traces are stored in a binary format. The code for opening them can be found at http://www.filesystems.org/project-tracefs.html. 2007 13 days 1 Million 57.7 MB
HP FSTraces
Five system call traces taken in 2000
2000 10 days 9.9 GB
LASR Traces
I/O traces taken at the system-call level in 2000 and 2001 as part of a security research project. The traces cover thirteen computers used for software development by CS researchers. The longest trace (machine02) runs from June 2000 to August 2001.

The traces are further described in a README file.

The traces are in the SEER format; a tool to read the traces can be found here. 1999-2001 over 1 year 566 Million 3.17 GB
LASR Traces (ASCII)
I/O traces taken at the system-call level in 2000 and 2001 as part of a security research project. The traces cover thirteen computers used for software development by CS researchers. The longest trace (machine02) runs from June 2000 to August 2001.

The traces are further described in a README file.

The traces have been converted to ASCII using the binary tool to read the Seer format. 1999-2001 over 1 year 566 Million 5.49 GB
LASR Traces (Binary)
I/O traces taken at the system-call level in 2000 and 2001 as part of a security research project. The traces cover thirteen computers used for software development by CS researchers. The longest trace (machine02) runs from June 2000 to August 2001.

The traces are further described in a README file.

The traces can be read using the Seer reading tool. 1999-2001 over 1 year 566 Million 3.17 GB
Seer Traces (ASCII)
I/O traces taken at the system-call level, excluding reads and writes but including opens, closes and all other I/O calls, and including process-related calls such as fork and exec. The traces cover nine laptop computers used for software development by CS researchers, some with very heavy activity. The longest trace (norgay) extends from April 2, 1996, to January 28, 1997; the shortest (crockett) is October 11 to November 19, 1996. All traces contain gaps representing times when the machines were rebooted or the trace software failed. Activity by the superuser is generally omitted.

Additional information about these traces can be found here.

These traces are already in readable (ASCII) format. 1996-1997 about 1 year 72 Million 792 MB
Seer Traces
I/O traces taken at the system-call level, excluding reads and writes but including opens, closes and all other I/O calls, and including process-related calls such as fork and exec. The traces cover nine laptop computers used for software development by CS researchers, some with very heavy activity. The longest trace (norgay) extends from April 2, 1996, to January 28, 1997; the shortest (crockett) is October 11 to November 19, 1996. All traces contain gaps representing times when the machines were rebooted or the trace software failed. Activity by the superuser is generally omitted.

Additional information about these traces can be found here.

A tool to read these traces is here. 1996-1997 about 1 year 72 Million 553 MB
CMU DFS Traces (ASCII)
This is a set of system-call traces collected for the Carnegie Mellon Online Coda Project. The traces cover 33 hosts running Mach. Several different workloads are represented, including file server, workstation, and time-sharing systems.
The traces have been converted to ASCII using the CMU-DFStrace Reading Tools 1991-1993 almost 3 years 1.01 Billion 13.7 GB
CMU DFS Traces
This is a set of system-call traces collected for the Carnegie Mellon Online Coda Project. The traces cover 33 hosts running Mach. several different workloads are represented, including file server, workstation, and time-sharing systems.
These traces are in a binary format. Tools for processing the traces can be found here 1991-1993 almost 3 years 1 Billion 22.6 GB

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